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"SKIING IS A SLIDING SPORT"--a skiing web manual: contents (topics at page bottoms of manual)
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   "SKIING IS A SLIDING SPORT":
 Conventional Skiing Wisdoms (CSW's) 

by Bill Jones, Ski Instructor
Certified Professional Ski Instructor (Registration #110478), Level III
private ski lessons at Keystone, Breckenridge, Vail, Beaver Creek, other areas

 CSW #2: "Sit back when skiing powder."

Surely you don't want to put too much weight on the fronts of your skis in powder, else the tips might dive into the snow and stop, with you continuing on in a tumble without them. Should you be coming to a snowbank or clump of snow, a little extra pressure on the tails of the skis can keep you planing right on up over the hump and out of harm's way. Sitting back continually, however, puts great stress on your thigh muscles and cannot be continued long by most skiers. Why not ski balanced and use the entire length  and the shape of the ski to effect your turns, just as in skiing on groomed slopes? You'll be using your bones more to support your weight, and as you get tossed a bit by the powder snow's varying resistance, you'll have more of your muscle strength left to rebalance yourself  and to initiate tipping to make your turns. Too, you'll be able to move your central balance point more quickly forward or aft as you need. If  you are back in the aft position, you will have to move through neutral, too, to get to the forward position, and this longer required range of motion may take you too long to get where you need to be soon enough and....

main CSW contents
prior CSW #1: "Keep the feet and therefore the skis together"
next CSW #3: "To turn, shift your weight"

"SKIING IS A SLIDING SPORT"--a skiing web manual:     Skiing Web Manual Contents   Why Read This Skiing Web Manual That First Skiing Lesson  A Little Skiing History    Motion in Skiing  CONVENTIONAL SKIING WISDOMS  Skier Excuses   Fear in Skiing  Conditioning for Skiing   Equipment and Technique  Skiing Equipment  How Skis Work   How to Develop Balance on Skis  A Skiing Turn Simplified  The Final Skiing Skill: pressure management  Tactics for Terrains and Snow Textures and Racing  Skiing Tips and Tales--a potpourri    Exercises for Developing Skiing Skills  Children and Skiing Age and Skiing Gender & Skiing  Culture & Skiing  Skiing Ethics and Survival  Slope Safety  Skiing Environment  Glossary Acknowledgements SkiMyBest Website Contents  
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